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How To Make Flanged Pipes Loads in OO / 1:76 | Model Railway Hints, Tips, How To Articles and Reviews at Model Trains Online
Terry sent in this rather brilliant tutorial on how to turn old Steradent or Multi-Vitamin tubes into some rather superb flanged pipe industrial loads for wagons & lorries. The same idea would work perfectly for other tubes of different diameters too. Here’s Terry to show us how he did it…
“Hi Justin,
This is how I made my flanged pipe loads. Mine have been made for a OO / 1:76 scale layout but these could be used with a variety of scales, or you can use smaller diameter pipes etc for N gauge.

What You Will Need

  • An old Steradent or Multi-Vitamin tube
  • Thick card or thin plastic
  • Abrasive paper (assorted grades)
  • A pair of compasses or circle cutter
  • A mini drill or bradawl
  • Suitable acrylic or enamel paints
The tools you'll need to make the flanged pipes

The tools you’ll need to make the flanged pipes

How To Do It…

First make sure that the tubes are thoroughly washed, inside and out. The tablets can leave an oily or gritty residue which can reacts badly with the paint. Cut off both ends. A razor saw or junior hacksaw will make short work of this job but the open (top) end can bend out of shape is you are too heavy handed. I use a Stanley knife for greater control. The open end needs to be cut off as it has a bit of a lip which isn’t needed. Don’t throw it away though, you may need it later.
Next remove the printing. I rub mine down with three grades of wet and dry, each finer than the last. This takes off the print and gives the paint a nice key. You don’t want a glass smooth finish, because the real thing isn’t smooth either. Don’t forget to give the inside a rub too as the inner is very visible when finished. Also, smooth the cut ends so the flanges will fit better.
Here you can see the plastic tube I'm using the make the pipe along with the flanges that I'm preparing from cardboard

Here you can see the plastic tube I’m using the make the pipe along with the flanges that I’m preparing from cardboard

The flanged ends are the hardest part. I measured the internal diameter using vernier calipers but you could just draw round the inside of the top of the tube which you had already cut off. I had some thick card but thin plastic sheet would work well. Find the centre by careful measurement. Work out how large you want your flanges to be and mark out the outer diameter. On real pipes, flange ends were sometimes left plain, to be drilled on site. If you want to drill yours now, do it before cutting out the circles. Draw a line between the two and mark your drilling points. A protractor makes it easier to keep them equal but it isn’t essential. Use a bradawl or mini drill to make your holes and clean up the swarf at the end. I used a 1.2 mm bit, because it will close up a little when painted. Don’t worry if the fit isn’t perfect, the real thing is welded on, so there is often a slight lip, plus you can always fill or file.
The flanges have now been glued into place and the whole thing given a quick coat of grey primer

The flanges have now been glued into place and the whole thing given a quick coat of grey primer

After leaving it for a day to let the glue dry, I under-coated mine with Supadec grey primer. When this had gone off I did the top coat. One was done with Halfords red primer. The other was sprayed with a light coat of PlastiKote pewter spray, which I found in Wilkos. I expect Humbrol Metalcote would also work well too.
And here we have a pair of finished flanged pipes... one in Red Oxide primer, the other in pristine bare metal finish

And here we have a pair of finished flanged pipes… one in Red Oxide primer, the other in pristine bare metal finish

Hope you enjoyed the tutorial… If you have any questions or comments for Terry, please feel free to post them via the comments forms below.
Thanks for reading
Justin

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One Response to How To Make Flanged Pipes Loads in OO / 1:76

  1. builder kim says:

    wow Terry very nice idea .I like that. now you have given me an idea in the future builds. thanks tons for the info on how to build them. love to see more Terry as what you are using them for thanks

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